Thursday, January 21, 2010

Prison


We will be assisting the local prison in providing food until their supplies can be restocked. USAID and Cross International are subsidizing this effort by redirecting packaged food meant for a meal program destined for out-lying schools. The food is prepared in our antiquated kitchen at Castel-Pere and delivered to the prison where some of our staff and older boys distribute the meals. The conditions in the prison are horrendous. The cells are holding 50 to 75 people when they were designed for eight or, at most, twelve people. There are too many people to allow everyone to sleep at the same time. The walls and roof are being repaired but will take time so the prisoners suffer. I have more photos but decided to only post one as to do more smacks of voyeurism or trying to capitalize on the backs of our unfortunate brothers. Please keep these people in your prayers. The guards, too, need your prayers. They are as much in shock and disbelief as the incarcerated.

5 comments:

rwa said...

Those prison conditions are inhumane. The after"shocks" do not just come from the shifting of a fault under the ground--There are many shocking aftereffects! These prisoners are also grieving the loss of friends and family members. Some of these men are not even guilty of any crime - the justice system in Haiti is not always swift and even the innocent can be locked up for a long time while awaiting judgement.

Anonymous said...

Why did you remove the photo? I understand that you don't want to encroach on voyeurism, but without the photo much of what you said in your post may not resonate with many people. 50-75 in a cell that is meant to hold 8-12 is almost too unimaginable to be believable. The words becomes powerful and undeniable with the illustration attached. The conditions are inhumane, to say the least. The photo puts it into perspective and forces the viewer to "feel" it. It's journalism. Without journalism less people would be caring right now. Many would be just going on with their own lives as usual. Much of what is going on, we would not even know about. The images that we are seeing on the news, internet etc. are horrible ... but necessary. Don't feel that you are capitalizing. You are doing a service by getting the story/info out there.

Sometimes journalism (no matter how brutal) is necessary!

Anonymous said...

You are the best Father Marc, the very best.

LM said...

I can't do much but I thought I would try to get some publicity for you. I contacted Relevant Radio and a much visited Catholic blog. And I sent a tweet about you and your mission. Twitter may be a good way to reach people. Maybe you can assign someone in your organization to be the twitter person.

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